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The 2,000 Year History of Cardiff Castle and the Animal Wall

Cardiff Castle carries with it 2000 years of history, having first been controlled by the Romans who saw its value being so close to the sea. The Roman occupation of Southern Wales began the first stage of the fort, building huge stone walls and maintaining it for its first few centuries AD.

The Keep was built in 1091 by Robert Fitzhamon, the Norman Lord of Gloucester. He took control of the location as the castle was left dormant for after the Romans left around 400ad. The Keep took many shapes over the years. Originally built out of wood, then made into stone in the tenth century. At that time it actually used as a prison to the Duke of Normandy until his death in 1134.

In 1865, Lord Bute really got work by pulling the best historians and the finest craftsmen in Wales to bring Cardiff Castle to its current state. One craftsman was architect William Burges. He remodeled interior rooms, added several towers, rebuilt the Octagon Tower and added a library and banqueting hall.

The most notable feature that was added during this time period is the clock tower. This tower was built in 1875, where a Roman Bastion once was. To this day we have the Butes to thank for renovating and building onto the castle for the almost 200 years they spent with it.

(Source: atlasobscura.com)

laughingsquid:

Salvaged Bicycle Chain Chandeliers by Carolina Fontoura Alzaga

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laughingsquid:

Salvaged Bicycle Chain Chandeliers by Carolina Fontoura Alzaga

forbiddenalleys:



Bone Chandelier, Sedlec Ossuary

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forbiddenalleys:

Bone Chandelier, Sedlec Ossuary

kitschyliving:

Adam Wallacavage

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kitschyliving:

Adam Wallacavage

The Chapel Made of Skulls and Bones

The Sedlec Ossuary is a small Roman Catholic chapel, located beneath the Cemetery Church of All Saints in Sedlec, a suburb of Kutna Hora in the Czech Republic. The ossuary is estimated to contain the skeletons of between 40,000 and 70,000 people, whose bones have in many cases been artistically arranged to form decorations and furnishings for the chapel. The ossuary is among the most visited tourist attractions of the Czech Republic, attracting over 200,000 visitors yearly.

In 1870 František Rint, a woodcarver, was employed by the Schwarzenberg family to put the bone heaps into order. The macabre result of his effort speaks for itself. Four enormous bell-shaped mounds occupy the corners of the chapel. An enormous chandelier of bones, which contains at least one of every bone in the human body, hangs from the center of the nave with garlands of skulls draping the vault.