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Newly Discovered Deep Sea Worms Unknown to Science

Scientist and marine researcher Alexander Semenov, recently released a number of incredible new photographs of worms, several of which may be completely unknown to science.

Half of the photos were taken near the Great Barrier Reef in Australia during a 2-week conference on marine worms called polychaetes. Semenov photographed 222 different worm species which are now in the process of being studied and documented by scientists.

The other half of the photos were taken during Semenov’s normal course of work at the White Sea Biological Station in northern Russia where he’s head of the scientific divers team. 

(Source: thisiscolossal.com)

The Ancient Art of Honey Hunting in Nepal

The Gurange tribes of Nepal have been collecting honey from Himalayan cliffs for centuries. The Gurung are master honey hunters, risking their lives collecting honeycomb using nothing more than handmade rope ladders and long sticks known as tangos.

Most of the honey bees’ nests are located on steep, inaccessible, southwest facing cliffs to avoid predators and for increased exposure to direct sunlight.

Aside from the dangers of falling, they are harvesting honey from the largest honey bees in the world. The Himalayan honey bee can grow up to 3 cm in length.

Before a hunt can commence, the honey hunters are required to perform a ceremony to placate the cliff gods. This involves sacrificing a sheep, offering flowers, fruits and rice, and praying to the cliff gods to ensure a safe hunt.

Photographer Andrew Newey spent two weeks living with the Gurung in central Nepal, documenting the risks and skill involved in this dying tradition.

(Source: theguardian.com)

Baby Hedgehog
England—Just four days old and 2.5 inches long, an abandoned hoglet—as baby hedgehogs are often called—snuggles up to a folded towel at a rescue center in Royal Tunbridge Wells, Kent. Warmth and cleanliness are vital to keeping the tiny animals healthy.
Photo by Phil Yeomans, Bournemouth News and Picture Service

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Baby Hedgehog

England—Just four days old and 2.5 inches long, an abandoned hoglet—as baby hedgehogs are often called—snuggles up to a folded towel at a rescue center in Royal Tunbridge Wells, Kent. Warmth and cleanliness are vital to keeping the tiny animals healthy.

Photo by Phil Yeomans, Bournemouth News and Picture Service

(Source: National Geographic)

rorschachx:

Mudskippers - Krabi, Thailand | image by Daniel Trim

They are completely amphibious fish, fish that can use their pectoral fins to walk on land.  Mudskippers are quite active when out of water, feeding and interacting with one another, for example to defend their territories.
 They are found in tropical, subtropical and temperate regions, including the Indo-Pacific and the Atlantic coast of Africa.
 (via wiki)

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rorschachx:

Mudskippers - Krabi, Thailand | image by Daniel Trim

They are completely amphibious fish, fish that can use their pectoral fins to walk on land.  Mudskippers are quite active when out of water, feeding and interacting with one another, for example to defend their territories.

They are found in tropicalsubtropical and temperate regions, including the Indo-Pacific and the Atlantic coast of Africa.

(via wiki)

Dec 30th at 3PM / via: rorschachx / op: rorschachx / tagged: science. animals. fish. mudskippers. krabi. thailand. / reblog / 1,989 notes

Amazing Surreal Body Art Illusions

These incredible body paintings are almost more performance art than body art. The models bodies are transformed into beautiful creatures. These body art illusions are created by 25-year-old German artist Gesine Marwedel. The young artist uses the human body as her canvas despite that it is a difficult medium to paint and work with - its living. Her canvas breathes, sweats and moves. Her paint brush turns models into amazingly alive swans or dolphins, making it hard to believe it’s all painted onto real people. Marwedel admits that she loves how body painting helps people to rediscover their beauty. (via Beautiful Life)

Barry — The Most Famous Life-Saving Dog in History

St. Bernard dogs are famous for saving lives and Barry, a St. Bernard from the early 19th century, is the most famous. Since the early 18th century, monks living in the snowy, dangerous St. Bernard Pass—a route through the Alps between Italy and Switzerland—kept the canines to help them on their rescue missions after bad snowstorms. Over a span of nearly 200 years, about 2,000 people, from lost children to Napoleon’s soldiers, were rescued because of the heroic dogs’ uncanny sense of direction and resistance to cold.

At the turn of the 18th century, servants called marroniers were assigned to accompany travelers between the hospice and Bourg-Saint-Pierre, a municipality on the Swiss side. By 1750, marroniers were routinely accompanied by St. Bernard dogs, whose broad chests helped to clear paths for travelers. The marroniers soon discovered the dogs’ tremendous sense of smell and ability to discover people buried deep in the snow, and sent them out in packs of two or three alone to seek lost or injured travelers.

The canines made rescue excursions on the St. Bernard Pass for the next 150 years. Often the dogs would find buried travelers, dig through the snow and lie on top of the injured to provide warmth. Meanwhile, the other dog would return to the hospice to alert the monks of the stranded pilgrim. The system became so organized that when Napoleon and his 250,000 soldiers crossed through the pass between 1790 and 1810, not one soldier lost his life.
The most famous of the St. Bernard rescue dogs was Barry, who lived in the monastery from 1800-1814. Barry is said to have saved the lives of more than 40 people from the freezing snow and treacherous conditions of the Alps.

In 1815, Barry’s taxidermied body was put on exhibit at the Natural History Museum in Berne, Switzerland, where it has stood for the last 200 years and remains today, standing proudly in the lobby of the museum.

The legend surrounding Barry was that he was killed while attempting a rescue; however, this is untrue. Barry retired to Bern, Switzerland and after his death, his body was passed into the care of the Natural History Museum of Bern. His story and name have been used in literary works, and a monument to him stands in the Cimetière des Chiens, a well-known pet cemetery near Paris.

At the hospice, one dog has always been named Barry in his honor and, since 2004, the Foundation Barry du Grand Saint Bernard has been set up to take over the responsibility for breeding dogs from the hospice.

source 1, 2, 3