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The Ancient Rock-Cut Tombs of Myra’s Lycian Necropolis

The ancient town of Myra in Turkey may sound familiar to you, because St. Nicholas (one of the Santa Claus origins) was the bishop of Myra. Another claim to fame for the region is the many ancient ruins one can see there.

Perhaps most striking of all the ancient ruins in Myra are the rock-cut tombs of the ancient Lycian necropolis. Two burial sites, the river necropolis and ocean necropolis, with frontages resembling classical temples, are hewn from the cliffs towering above the town.

You can imagine the years of work that went into carving these tombs out of the cliff faces.

(Source: neatorama.com)

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Kedareshwar Cave - India
Local legend holds that when the fourth pillar breaks, the world will come to an end.  The cave of Kedareshwar, in which there is a big Shivling, is totally surrounded by water. The Shivling (also known as Lingam) is a representation of the Hindu deity Shiva used for worship in temples. Whether the lingam symbolizes the physical body of the god or something purely spiritual is the topic of many a century-old debate within Hinduism. The total height from its base is five feet and the water is waist-deep. It is quite difficult to reach the Shivling, as the water is ice-cold. There are sculptures carved out of the rocks here. In monsoon seasons, it is not possible to reach this cave, as a huge stream flows across its path.

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yourmaj3sty:

Kedareshwar Cave - India

Local legend holds that when the fourth pillar breaks, the world will come to an end.  The cave of Kedareshwar, in which there is a big Shivling, is totally surrounded by water. The Shivling (also known as Lingam) is a representation of the Hindu deity Shiva used for worship in temples. Whether the lingam symbolizes the physical body of the god or something purely spiritual is the topic of many a century-old debate within Hinduism. The total height from its base is five feet and the water is waist-deep. It is quite difficult to reach the Shivling, as the water is ice-cold. There are sculptures carved out of the rocks here. In monsoon seasons, it is not possible to reach this cave, as a huge stream flows across its path.